Frequently read articles
Dr. Breggin's latest scientific book, Brain-Disabling Treatments in Psychiatry, covers and updates all of the material in these articles with the latest scientific documentation. His newest popular book, Medication Madness, covers similar material with an emphasis on dramatic real-life illustrations of people emotionally injured or destroyed by medications, based entirely on cases Dr. Breggin personally evaluated in his clinical and medical-legal practice.
 
 

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file icon Psychiatric drug-induced Chronic Brain Impairment (CBI) 01/27/2012
Psychiatric drug-induced Chronic Brain Impairment (CBI): Implications for longterm treatment with psychiatric medication. International Journal of Risk & Safety in Medicine, 23: 193-200.
Peter R. Breggin, MD
Abstract: Understanding the hazards associated with long-term exposure to psychiatric drugs is very important but rarely emphasized in the scientific literature and clinical practice. Drawing on the scientific literature and clinical experience, the author describes the syndrome of Chronic Brain Impairment (CBM) which can be caused by any trauma to the brain including Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI), electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), and long-term exposure to psychiatric medications. Knowledge of the syndrome should enable clinicians to more easily identify long-term adverse effects caused by psychiatric drugs while enabling researchers to approach the problem with a more comprehensive understanding of the common elements of brain injury as they are manifested after long-term exposure to psychiatric medications. Treatment options are also discussed.
file icon A Misdiagnosis, Anywhere 10/13/2011

A Misdiagnosis, Anywhere. The New York Times, Oct 13, 2011.


The drugging of children for A.D.H.D. has become an epidemic. More than 5 million U.S. children, or 9.5 percent, were diagnosed with A.D.H.D. as of 2007. About 2.8 million had received a prescription for a stimulant medication in 2008. ...

file icon Intoxication Anosognosia: The Spellbinding Effect of Psychiatric Drugs, Ethical Human Psychology and 02/28/2011
Intoxication Anosognosia: The Spellbinding Effect of Psychiatric Drugs, Ethical Human Psychology and Psychiatry, 8, 201-215, 2006.

Why do so many individuals persist in taking psychoactive substances, including psychiatric drugs, after adverse mental and behavioral effects have become severe and even disabling? The author has previously proposed the brain-disabling principle of psychiatric treatment that all somatic psychiatric treatments impair the function of the brain and mind. Intoxication anosognosia (medication spellbinding) is an expression of this druginduced mental disability. Intoxication anosognosia causes the victim to underestimate the degree of drug-induced mental impairment, to deny the harmful role that the drug plays in the person’s altered state, and in many cases compel the individual to mistakenly believe that he or she is functioning better. In the extreme, the individual displays out-of-character compulsively destructive behaviors, including violence toward self and others.
file icon Campaign against racist federal programs by the ICSPP 05/15/2008
file icon Should the use of neuroleptics be severely limited? 05/15/2008
file icon Electroshock (ECT): Scientific, Ethical, & Political Issues 05/15/2008
file icon Analysis of adverse behavioral effects of benzodiazepines (tranquilizers) 05/15/2008
file icon Psychostimulants in the treatment of children diagnosed with ADHD 05/15/2008
file icon What psychologists and psychiatrists need to know about ADHD and stimulants 05/15/2008
file icon Confirming the hazards of stimulant drug treatment 05/15/2008
Ritalin, Adderall, Concerta, and other drugs
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WARNING!

Most psychiatric drugs can cause withdrawal reactions, sometimes including life-threatening emotional and physical withdrawal problems. In short, it is not only dangerous to start taking psychiatric drugs, it can also be dangerous to stop them. Withdrawal from psychiatric drugs should be done carefully under experienced clinical supervision. Methods for safely withdrawing from psychiatric drugs are discussed in Dr. Breggin's new book, Psychiatric Drug Withdrawal: A Guide for Prescribers, Therapists, Patients, and Their Families.