Selected scientific papers
This section contains a selection of Dr. Breggin's scientific articles spanning 1964 to the present. They can be arranged chronologically in order to facilitate an overview of his work over the years.
 
 

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file icon From Prozac to Ecstasy: implications of new evidence for drug-induced brain damage (2001) 01/01/2001
"From Prozac to Ecstacy: The Implication of New Evidence for Drug-Induced Brain Damage." Ethical Human Sciences and Services, 3: 3-5, 2001.
file icon A dangerous assignment (2001) 03/01/2001
"A dangerous assignment," In Howard Rosenthal (Ed.). Favorite Counseling and Therapy Homework Assignments: Leading Therapists Share their Most Creative Strategies, pp. 58-59. Philadelphia: Brunner Routledge, 2001.
file icon Electroshock: Scientific, Ethical, & Political Issues (1998) 01/01/1998
"Electroshock: Scientific, Ethical, and Political Issues." International Journal of Risk & Safety In Medicine, 11:5-40, 1998.
file icon A Case of Fluoxetine-induced Stimulant Side Effects with Suicidal Ideation... 01/02/1992
Breggin, P.R. (1992). A Case of Fluoxetine-induced Stimulant Side Effects with Suicidal Ideation Associated with a Possible Withdrawal Syndrome ("Crashing").  International Journal of Risk & Safety in Medicine, 3, 325-328.
file icon TBI, PTSD, and Psychiatric Drugs: A Perfect Storm for Aberrant States 05/08/2014

“TBI, PTSD, and psychiatric drugs. A perfect storm for causing abnormal mental states and aberrant behavior.” In Brock, H. and Else, R.C. (Eds). The Attorney’s Guide to Defending Veterans in Criminal Court. Minneapolis, MN: Veterans Defense Project. Chapter 10, pp. 251-264, 2014.


Peter R. Breggin, MD


Recent years have seen a marked increase in the prescription of psychiatric drugs to activity duty military personnel and to veterans. Until the Iraq and Afghanistan wars, soldiers were rarely if ever sent into combat while taking psychiatric drugs, but now it is commonplace, and may occur in 20% or considerably more of combat troops. Nearly all soldiers returning from combat with psychiatric diagnoses will be placed on multiple psychiatric drugs and maintained on them during treatment at the VA.

file icon Brain damage, dementia and persistent cognitive dysfunction associated with neuroleptics (German) 03/30/1990
"Brain damage, dementia and persistent cognitive dysfunction associated with neuroleptics: Evidence, Etiology, Implications." Journal of Mind Behavior, 11:425-464, 1990. German Edition
file icon Risks and Mechanism of Action of Stimulants 11/16/1998
Risks and Mechanism of Action of Stimulants. NIH Consensus Development Conference on Diagnosis and Treatment of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, November 16-18, 1998.
file icon The Rights of Children and Parents Regarding Child Diagnosis and Drugging 04/26/2014
The Rights of Children and Parents In Regard to Children Receiving Psychiatric Diagnoses and Drugs. Children & Society, 28, (2014) pp. 231-241


Peter R. Breggin, MD


Based on the author's extensive clinical, forensic and research experience, this article addresses the scientific and moral question of whether it is ever in the best interests of a child to be given a psychiatric drug. The focus is on the diagnosis Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and stimulant drugs, and on the diagnosis Bipolar Disorder and antipsychotic (neuroleptic) drugs. The conclusion is that we should work towards a prohibition against giving psychiatric drugs to children, and instead focus on safe and effective alternative ways of meeting the needs of children within their families, schools and society. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and National Children's Bureau.

file icon Presumed Prudence Leaves Children Susceptible to Electroshock 04/26/2014

The Utmost Discretion: How Presumed Prudence Leaves Children Susceptible to Electroshock. Children & Society, 28, (2014) pp. 231-241


Cheryl van Daalen-Smith, Simon Adam, Peter Breggin and Brenda A. LeFrançois


This article examines the controversial and largely publicly undocumented practice of administering electroconvulsive therapy (ECT or electroshock) to children who are undergoing psychiatric treatment. Conventional psychiatric beliefs and practices are challenged, along with a presentation of the history of scientific research which questions electroshock's 'effectiveness' and outlines its brain-damaging and incapacitating effects. As such, we provide counterarguments regarding the legitimacy of ECT as a treatment option, deconstructing the principle of presumed prudence in its use. Our analysis leads us to conclude that the 'principle of presumed prudence' should be eschewed in favour of the 'precautionary principle', in order to underscore and uphold the medical ethos 'to do no harm' and to ensure the application of children's rights within the psychiatric system. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and National Children's Bureau.

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WARNING!

Most psychiatric drugs can cause withdrawal reactions, sometimes including life-threatening emotional and physical withdrawal problems. In short, it is not only dangerous to start taking psychiatric drugs, it can also be dangerous to stop them. Withdrawal from psychiatric drugs should be done carefully under experienced clinical supervision. Methods for safely withdrawing from psychiatric drugs are discussed in Dr. Breggin's new book, Psychiatric Drug Withdrawal: A Guide for Prescribers, Therapists, Patients, and Their Families.