Selected scientific papers
This section contains a selection of Dr. Breggin's scientific articles spanning 1964 to the present. They can be arranged chronologically in order to facilitate an overview of his work over the years.
 
 

DocumentsDate added

Order by : Name | Date | Hits [ Descendent ]
file icon ECT Damages the Brain: Disturbing News (2007) 10/24/2008
"ECT Damages the Brain: Disturbing News for Patients and Shock Doctors Alike." Ethical Human Psychology and Psychiatry, 9, 83-86, 2007.
file icon A biomedical programme for urban violence control (1993) 02/01/1993
"A biomedical programme for urban violence control in the U.S." (Peter Breggin and Ginger Ross Breggin). Changes: An International Journal of Psychology and Psychotherapy 11, No. 1 (March) :59-71, 1993.
file icon A Case of Fluoxetine-induced Stimulant Side Effects with Suicidal Ideation... 01/02/1992
Breggin, P.R. (1992). A Case of Fluoxetine-induced Stimulant Side Effects with Suicidal Ideation Associated with a Possible Withdrawal Syndrome ("Crashing").  International Journal of Risk & Safety in Medicine, 3, 325-328.
file icon A dangerous assignment (2001) 03/01/2001
"A dangerous assignment," In Howard Rosenthal (Ed.). Favorite Counseling and Therapy Homework Assignments: Leading Therapists Share their Most Creative Strategies, pp. 58-59. Philadelphia: Brunner Routledge, 2001.
file icon A tribute to Professor Steve Baldwin (2001) 02/01/2001
"A tribute to Professor Steve Baldwin," Ethical Human Sciences and Services, 3: 71, 2001.
file icon Analysis of adverse behavioral effects of benzodiazepines (1998) 02/01/1998
"Analysis of adverse behavioral effects of benzodiazepines (tranquilizers)," Journal of Mind and Behavior, 19:21-50, 1998.
file icon Antidepressant-Induced Suicide, Violence, and Mania: Risks for Military Personnel 02/11/2011

Ethical Human Psychology and Psychiatry, Volume 12, Number 2, 2010.


Peter R. Breggin, MD


The newer antidepressants frequently cause suicide, violence, and manic-like symptoms of activation or overstimulation, presenting serious hazards to active-duty soldiers who carry weapons under stressful conditions. These antidepressant-induced symptoms of activation can mimic posttraumatic stress disorder and are likely to worsen this common disorder in soldiers, increasing the hazard when they are prescribed to military personnel. Antidepressants should not be prescribed to soldiers during or after deployment.

file icon Biological evolution of guilt, shame and anxiety 07/07/2015
The biological evolution of guilt, shame and anxiety: A new theory of negative legacy emotions. Medical Hypotheses 85 (2015) 17–24

 

Peter R. Breggin

 

Human beings are the most social and the most violent creatures on Earth. The combination of cooperation and aggression enabled us to dominate our ecosystem. However, the existence of violent impulses would have made it difficult or impossible for humans to live in close-knit families and clans without destroying each other. Nature’s answer was the development of guilt, shame and anxiety—internal emotional inhibitions or restraints specifically against aggressive self-assertion within the family and other close relationships.

 

The theory of negative legacy emotions proposes the first unitary concept for the biopsychosocial function of guilt, shame and anxiety, and seeks their origin in biological evolution and natural selection. Natural selection favored individuals with built-in emotional restraints that reduced conflicts within their family and tribal unit, optimizing their capacity to survive and reproduce within the protection of their small, intimate societies, while maintaining their capacity for violence against outsiders. Unfortunately, these negative legacy emotions are rudimentary and often ineffective in their psychosocial and developmental function. As a result, they produce many unintended untoward effects, including the frequent breakdown of restraints in the family and the uninhibited unleashing of violence against outsiders.

file icon Brain damage, dementia and persistent cognitive dysfunction associated with neuroleptics (1990) 01/01/1990
"Brain damage, dementia and persistent cognitive dysfunction associated with neuroleptics: Evidence, Etiology, Implications." Journal of Mind Behavior 11:425-464, 1990.
file icon Brain damage, dementia and persistent cognitive dysfunction associated with neuroleptics (German) 03/30/1990
"Brain damage, dementia and persistent cognitive dysfunction associated with neuroleptics: Evidence, Etiology, Implications." Journal of Mind Behavior, 11:425-464, 1990. German Edition
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WARNING!

Most psychiatric drugs can cause withdrawal reactions, sometimes including life-threatening emotional and physical withdrawal problems. In short, it is not only dangerous to start taking psychiatric drugs, it can also be dangerous to stop them. Withdrawal from psychiatric drugs should be done carefully under experienced clinical supervision. Methods for safely withdrawing from psychiatric drugs are discussed in Dr. Breggin's new book, Psychiatric Drug Withdrawal: A Guide for Prescribers, Therapists, Patients, and Their Families.