Selected scientific papers
This section contains a selection of Dr. Breggin's scientific articles spanning 1964 to the present. They can be arranged chronologically in order to facilitate an overview of his work over the years.
 
 

DocumentsDate added

Order by : Name | Date | Hits [ Descendent ]
file icon From Prozac to Ecstasy: implications of new evidence for drug-induced brain damage (2001) 01/01/2001
"From Prozac to Ecstacy: The Implication of New Evidence for Drug-Induced Brain Damage." Ethical Human Sciences and Services, 3: 3-5, 2001.
file icon Guidelines for Counseling and Psychotherapy (2008) 02/10/2010
"Practicle Applications: 22 Guidelines for Counseling and Psychotherapy." Ethical Human Psychology and Psychiatry, 10, 43-57, 2008.
file icon Harms of Exposure to SSRIs In Utero (2008) 02/10/2010
"Exposure to SSRI Antidepressants In Utero Causes Birth Defects, Neonatal Withdrawal Symptoms, and Brain Damage." Ethical Human Psychology and Psychiatry, 10, 5-9, 2008.
file icon Iatrogenic helplessness in authoritarian therapy (1983) 02/01/1983
"Iatrogenic Helplessness in Authoritarian Psychiatry." In Morgan RF (ed): The Iatrogenics Handbook. Toronto, IPI Publishing Company, 39-51, 1983.
file icon Intoxication anosognosia: medication spellbinding (2006) 06/01/2011
"Intoxication Anosognosia: The Spellbinding Effect of Psychiatric Drugs", Ethical Human Psychology and Psychiatry, 8, 201-215, 2006.

ABSTRACT: Why do so many individuals persist in taking psychoactive substances, including psychiatric drugs, after adverse mental and behavioral effects have become severe and even disabling? The author has previously proposed the brain-disabling principle of psychiatric treatment that all somatic psychiatric treatments impair the function of the brain and mind. Intoxication anosognosia (medication spellbinding) is an expression of this druginduced mental disability. Intoxication anosognosia causes the victim to underestimate the degree of drug-induced mental impairment, to deny the harmful role that the drug plays in the personís altered state, and in many cases compel the individual to mistakenly believe that he or she is functioning better. In the extreme, the individual displays out-of-character compulsively destructive behaviors, including violence toward self and others.

file icon Lobotomies: an alert (1972) 02/01/1972
"Lobotomies: An Alert." (letter) American Journal of Psychiatry 129:98-99, 1972.
file icon Lobotomy (1972) 01/01/1972
"Lobotomy." (co-authored by Daniel Greenburg). Science and Government Report, March 15, 1972, Volume II, No. 2, pp 1-4.
file icon Neuropathology and cognitive dysfunction from ECT (1986) 01/01/1986
"Neuropathology and Cognitive Dysfunction from ECT." Psychopharmacology Bulletin 22:476-479, 1986.
file icon NIH consensus report highlights controversy surrounding ADHD diagnosis and stimulant treatment(1999) 03/01/1999
"NIH Consensus Report Highlights Controversy Surrounding ADHD Diagnosis and Stimulant Treatment." Ethical Human Sciences and Services, 1:9-11, 1999.
file icon Parallels between neuroleptic effects and lethargic encephalitis (1993) 03/01/1993
"Parallels Between Neuroleptic Effects and Lethargic Encephalitis: The Production of Dyskinesias and Cognitive disorders." Brain and Cognition 23:8-27, 1993.
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WARNING!

Most psychiatric drugs can cause withdrawal reactions, sometimes including life-threatening emotional and physical withdrawal problems. In short, it is not only dangerous to start taking psychiatric drugs, it can also be dangerous to stop them. Withdrawal from psychiatric drugs should be done carefully under experienced clinical supervision. Methods for safely withdrawing from psychiatric drugs are discussed in Dr. Breggin's new book, Psychiatric Drug Withdrawal: A Guide for Prescribers, Therapists, Patients, and Their Families.