Selected scientific papers
This section contains a selection of Dr. Breggin's scientific articles spanning 1964 to the present. They can be arranged chronologically in order to facilitate an overview of his work over the years.
 
 

DocumentsDate added

Order by : Name | Date | Hits [ Descendent ]
file icon Should the use of neuroleptics be severely limited? (1994) 02/01/1996
"Should the Use of Neuroleptics Be Severely Limited?" In S.A Kirk and Susan D. Einbinder P (ed): Controversial Issues in Mental Health. Boston: Allyan and Bacon, 1994, pp 146-152. Reprinted in Changes: An International Journal of Psychology and Psychotherapy 14:62-66 March 1996.
file icon Spearheading a transformation (1996) 01/01/1996
"Spearheading a Transformation." Co-published simultaneously in The Psychotherapy Patient (The Hawthorn Press, Inc.) Vol.9, No. 3/4, pp. 1-7, 1996; and: Psychosocial Approaches to Deeply Disturbed Persons, P. Breggin and E. Stern, editors, The Hawthorn Press, Inc., 1-7, 1996.
file icon Suicidality, violence, and mania caused by selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors 01/01/2004
"Suicidality, Violence and Mania Caused by Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs): A Review and Analysis." International Journal of Risk and Safety in Medicine, 16: 31-49, 2003/2004. Originally published in Ethical Human Sciences and Services, 5:225-246.
file icon The FDA should test the safety of ECT machines 07/13/2010
International Journal of Risk & Safety in Medicine 22 (2010) 89-92.
Peter R. Breggin
Abstract: Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and the machines that deliver it have never been tested for safety and efficacy in order to receive approval from the FDA. The American Psychiatric Association and ECT advocates protested when the FDA took steps to classify the machines as posing “an unreasonable risk of illness or injury”, which would have required their testing before approval. Without requiring this testing, the FDA is now preparing to classify the treatment and the machines as safe. This article reviews evidence demonstrating that ECT is very harmful to the brain and mind, and concludes that the FDA should demand the usual testing, starting with animals, that is required before psychiatric treatments and machines are approved for marketing and use.
file icon The need for ethical human sciences and services 04/01/1999
"The Need for Ethical Human Sciences and Services." Ethical Human Sciences and Services, 1:3-6, 1999.
file icon The NIMH multimodal study of treatment for ADHD 04/01/2000
"The NIMH Multimodal Study of Treatment for Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: A Critical Analysis." International Journal of Risk and Safety in Medicine, 13:15-22, 2000. Originally published in Ethical Human Sciences and Services, 2:63-72, 2000.
file icon The psychiatric drugging of toddlers 02/01/2000
"The Psychiatric Drugging of Toddlers." Ethical Human Sciences and Services, 2: 83-86, 2000.
file icon The psychophysiology of anxiety 01/01/1970
"The Psychophysiology of Anxiety." Journal of Nervous Mental Diseases 139:558-568, 1964.
file icon The return of ECT 01/01/1992
"The Return of ECT." Readings: A Journal of Reviews and Commentary in Mental Health, 3 (March#1), 12-17, 1992.
file icon The return of lobotomy and psychosurgery 01/01/1982
"The Return of Lobotomy and Psychosurgery." Reprinted with a new introduction in Edwards RB (ed): Psychiatry and Ethics. Buffalo, Prometheus Books, 1982. Originally published in the Congressional Record , February 24, 1972, E1602-E1612. First reprinted in Quality of Health Care-Human Experimentation: Hearings Before Senator Edward Kennedy's Subcommittee on Health, US Senate, Washington, D.C., US Government Printing Office, 1973.
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WARNING!

Most psychiatric drugs can cause withdrawal reactions, sometimes including life-threatening emotional and physical withdrawal problems. In short, it is not only dangerous to start taking psychiatric drugs, it can also be dangerous to stop them. Withdrawal from psychiatric drugs should be done carefully under experienced clinical supervision. Methods for safely withdrawing from psychiatric drugs are discussed in Dr. Breggin's new book, Psychiatric Drug Withdrawal: A Guide for Prescribers, Therapists, Patients, and Their Families.